‘On the level’ vs ‘at the level’

‘On the level’ vs ‘at the level’

Are both prepositions correct? Do they mean the exact same thing? I have had this doubt myself and I decided to do some research and clear it out for once and all. When I have such doubts on English language usage, I go to – surprise, surprise – Ludwig and I searched
The Innovator’s Dilemma. 'Start-Up' vs. 'Startup' vs. 'Start up' vs. 'StartUp'

The Innovator’s Dilemma. 'Start-Up' vs. 'Startup' vs. 'Start up' vs. 'StartUp'

The tech scene is innovative in all aspects, not least in the linguistic one. Whether you spell it ‘start-up’, ‘startup’, ‘start up’, or ‘StartUp’ most likely won’t make any difference in the success of your business – you can write it wrong and succeed, or write it correctly and fail.
There, Their, They’re, Homophones Aren’t Easy

There, Their, They’re, Homophones Aren’t Easy

This trifecta of homophones – one an adverb, one a pronoun, one a contraction – shows up mercilessly in English writing. Made more difficult by the fact that spell checkers and grammar correctors often won’t catch this, because many people spell the words right, but don’t use them in sentences
"Affect" vs "Effect". A difference that may affect your life.

"Affect" vs "Effect". A difference that may affect your life.

Whether to use “affect” or “effect” is a challenge that continues to trip up even native speakers of English. Because it’s so frequently used, and improperly at that, we’ve included it in our homophone series, where we investigate words that sound similar but have very different meanings. Does
“Couldn’t care less” vs “Could care less”

“Couldn’t care less” vs “Could care less”

Which one should you use? Are both forms acceptable? Do you have an ongoing dispute with someone about these sentences? If this is the case, you are not alone: this controversial topic has long provoked discord between language users and between linguists. I spent some time untangling this debate and
To cut a long story short

To cut a long story short

Meaning: “To cut a long story short” simply means to leave out the details and shorten a story in order to get to the point. Use: If this is the real meaning, it is also worth noting how this idiom is really used. It is ironic that for this idiom,
Under the gun

Under the gun

Meaning: When you are “ under the gun “ you are under pressure to do something by a deadline or in a particular way. “This team has been under the gun for a while“. A less frequent alternative to “under the gun” would be “under the cosh” . Aussies also use “under the
Loose lips sink ships

Loose lips sink ships

This idiom rocks. It is one of my favorites because of its intriguing historical origin. Meaning “Loose lips sink ships” is a figurative admonition to avoid careless talk, especially when you don’t know who is listening. In fact, if someone is talking about potentially sensitive information he may unintentionally
When pigs fly

When pigs fly

Let’s dive a bit into the meaning, origin and use of another intriguing idiom. Meaning “When pigs fly” is used to describe figuratively something that most likely will never happen. “Mark plans to tidy up his room every week, but he will probably do it only when pigs fly”
It's raining cats and dogs

It's raining cats and dogs

As often happens with idioms, they have an obscure etymology. We are so curious about language that we decided to investigate a bit and discovered a couple of interesting things. Meaning “To rain cats and dogs” simply means “to rain very hard”. Origin and Etymology The etymology of “rain cats
DO vs MAKE

DO vs MAKE

Are you confused when you should use “do” and when “make”? Well, it is not a surprise, English language doesn’t have a clear rule to follow at this regard. The following rule of thumb (with a zillion exceptions) will help you figure it out. DO Use “do” when talking
"Bear with me" vs "Bare with me"

"Bear with me" vs "Bare with me"

This English writing doubt pops up so frequently in our users’ community that we decided to write down a short post to make this issue clearer. "Bear with" is a phrasal verb and a polite way of asking someone to be patient with someone or something (especially through difficulties), eg.
What to do if Ludwig web doesn’t work

What to do if Ludwig web doesn’t work

I know that you love Ludwig as much as we do. I also know that you need it up and running now, because you have to check a sentence urgently. If Ludwig is giving you back the following message, don’t freak out. If this is your case, the first
Bucket list

Bucket list

Meaning: A list of things one hopes to do before one dies. Origin and Etymology: If the phrase “kick the bucket” has its origins in the late 18th century, “bucket list” is much more recent. The most widely accepted theory is that it was minted in 2007 by Justin Zackham,
Kick the bucket

Kick the bucket

“Kick the bucket” is one of the most obscure and intriguing idioms in the English language (and one of my favorites). Meaning: It is a euphemistic and colloquial way to say “to die” (eg. “he kicked the bucket” ) or, if referred to a machine (e.g. “the car kicked the
“I wish I was” vs “I wish I were”

“I wish I was” vs “I wish I were”

Here we are with another frequent English writing doubt, which seems to frequently arise in our users’ community. Here is the rule: Always use the past simple after “I wish” (eg: "I wish I had a crystal ball", "I wish I knew you before", "I wish I had done better
“Attached please find” vs “please find attached”

“Attached please find” vs “please find attached”

Here we are again with the Doubt Series to clear out another hot topic coming from Ludwig’s most frequent searches. Do you know which one is correct? There are several supporters on each side, but the truth is that both are widely used in our trusted sources and can
Editing Vs Proofreading

Editing Vs Proofreading

Editing and Proofreading are frequently used as interchangeable synonyms by those who don’t know the difference. Nevertheless, even if they are both part of the process of revision a piece of writing, they involve a different set of activities and happen at different moments. Let’s stipulate that editing
Writing formal letters in English - The ultimate guide

Writing formal letters in English - The ultimate guide

We all know that writing formal letters is a pain, but with this 3 minute post I will help you to master all the boring conventions and write formally correct cover and business letters. This is how your letter should look like Sender Your address (or the return address) goes
How to write dates correctly

How to write dates correctly

Writing calendar dates correctly is important to edit the perfect formal letter" (we have a quick and effective guide for that) and get the job of your dreams. It looks more complicated than the Maya calendar, but this quick guide will guide through the mess. As rule of thumb, in
"Write in English" vs "Write English"

"Write in English" vs "Write English"

“Write in English” vs “Write English” Here we are for the first post of our Doubt Series, where we solve your most recurring writing doubts. Since “Write in English” vs “Write English” is a doubt that is frequently searched on Ludwig, I decided to dedicate a post to the topic.